Pulling back and looking at learning theories


As a K12 teacher in my formative years, I remember taking education courses while I was teaching high school French to complete my masters. These were required for NYS certification as well as tenure. Like most young teachers, my first years in the classroom were filled with daily, "urgent" needs to have lessons and materials prepared for my students. When I would go to my night classes and listen to professors expound on Dewey, Piaget, Vygotsky ... I had trouble making the connection between these theorists and my daily quest to improve my students' french skills and keep them motivated.

As we here at SLN prepare faculty to teach online, we strive to have faculty understand the theoretical framework for our approach, as well as furnish you with the important practical skills and strategies to create high-quality learning experiences for your students. We hope that, while there is a sense of urgency, you use the course development process in part, to consider your approach to learning in general. As a new faculty member, you will soon learn about the Community of Inquiry approach, for which we provide practical application strategies right away. This approach draws from existing learning theories as well as research about quality indicators in online courses. Learning-Theories.com provides a useful overview for those of you who would like to inform yourselves about learning theories.

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Notes

new member guide

Created by Alexandra M. Pickett Aug 19, 2010 at 11:52am. Last updated by Alexandra M. Pickett Jun 23, 2015.

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